Molybdenum Nanoparticles as a Potential Topical Medication for Alopecia Treatment through Antioxidant Pathways that Differ from Minoxidil

    Qin Xiao, Yongzhou Lu, Wei Yao, Chengchen Gong, Chuanlong Jia, Guojun Jin, Jing Guo, Tianwen Qiu, Yebin Jiang, Min Huang, Wenhua Chu, Qiannan Xu, Nan Xu
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    TLDR Molybdenum nanoparticles could be a new treatment for hair loss, working differently than minoxidil.
    The study "Molybdenum Nanoparticles as a Potential Topical Medication for Alopecia Treatment through Antioxidant Pathways that Differ from Minoxidil" explores the potential of molybdenum (Mo) nanoparticles in treating alopecia. The researchers hypothesized that Mo nanoparticles could promote hair growth by reducing oxidative stress and accelerating minoxidil-treated hair growth by upregulating SULT and sulfate transfer. To test this, they synthesized Mo nanoparticles and applied them to hair-removed mice. The results suggest that Mo nanoparticles could be a potential treatment for alopecia, offering a different mechanism from the FDA-approved treatment, minoxidil, which has a relatively low efficacy of 30-40%. The study was conducted on seven-week-old male C57BL/6 mice, divided into different treatment groups.
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