Clinical severity does not reliably predict quality of life in women with alopecia areata, telogen effluvium, or androgenic alopecia

    Erika E. Reid, Ann Cameron Haley, Judy H. Borovicka, Alfred Rademaker, Dennis P. West, Maria L. Colavincenzo, Heather W. Wickless
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    TLDR How bad a woman's hair loss is doesn't always match how it affects her happiness and daily life.
    The study involving 104 female patients with alopecia areata, telogen effluvium, or androgenic alopecia demonstrated that the clinical severity of hair loss did not reliably predict quality of life as measured by the Skindex-16 questionnaire. Patients' self-assessment of hair loss severity was more closely associated with their quality of life than dermatologists' assessments, particularly in the domains of symptoms, emotions, and function. The findings suggest that patients' perceptions of their hair loss are more impactful on their quality of life than the objective severity assessed by dermatologists. The study underscores the importance of considering psychological and quality of life factors in the treatment of alopecia and calls for further research into psychological treatments and coping strategies for affected individuals.
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