Teloptosis, a Turning Point in Hair Shedding Biorhythms

    January 2001 in “ Dermatology
    C Piérard-Franchimont, Gérald Pierard
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    TLDR Teloptosis is a key point in hair loss that could help in creating prevention-focused hair care strategies.
    The paper introduces the term "teloptosis" to describe the shedding of hair at the end of the telogen phase, which is independent of the initiation of the next anagen phase. Teloptosis results from the loss of adhesion between the club hair and its epithelial envelope, and its synchronization can lead to telogen effluvium, which may or may not be related to a shortened anagen phase. The study suggests that early or delayed teloptosis can affect hair density and that two types of telogen hairs can be distinguished by the presence or absence of an epithelial sheath, indicating the strength of binding. The paper also discusses the various factors that may influence hair growth and shedding, including local and systemic factors, as well as environmental influences. It notes that while some physiological and pathological stimuli can synchronize hair cycles, the mechanisms behind these processes are not fully understood. The concept of teloptosis is considered important in understanding different types of hair shedding and its potential role in alopecia. The paper concludes that teloptosis could be a key target in hair care strategies focused on prevention rather than regrowth.
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