The Ziering Whorl Classification of Scalp Hair

    August 2003 in “Dermatologic Surgery
    Craig Ziering, Gabriel Krenitsky
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    TLDR The conclusion is that creating natural-looking hair restoration requires replicating natural scalp whorl patterns and inserting grafts at specific angles.
    In 2003, Craig Ziering and Gabriel Krenitsky reviewed 534 patient photographs to create the Ziering Whorl Classification, a system to standardize the description and surgical reconstruction of scalp whorls. They identified five distinct whorl patterns, noting significant ethnic variability, with white males displaying the most distinct whorls and African Americans and women often showing a diffusion pattern. The study emphasized the importance of replicating these natural patterns in hair restoration surgery to achieve cosmetically successful outcomes. Dr. Ziering also stressed the need to insert grafts at specific angles to mimic the natural hair angles on the scalp for a natural appearance post-surgery.
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